Form Is Everything “Fit Over 50” Interview: Chris James

Steve: Tell us a little bit about yourself.  Your name, age, where you live, and what health and fitness activities you currently participate in.  Have you won any awards or set any records?  If so, please tell us about those.  

Chris James: I’m Chris James. Currently 52 and living in the UK with my partner, our son and two huskies. I don’t have any major accolades or titles but I was the first European to reach 50 and then 75x Tough Mudder events (a 10 – 13-mile obstacle challenge/race). I’ve also completed 4x World’s Toughest Mudder events which are the 24hr version (you complete 5-mile loops with obstacles in a 24hr period) and finished 50 miles or more at each in a variety of weather conditions from the desert heat of Vegas to an extreme cold event in Atlanta.

I take part in various endurance and challenge events so I can see what I can do and see where my limits are. As long as I can remember I’ve been interested in mental grit (resilience) and endurance and believe as humans we are capable of extraordinary things. Our ability to adapt and overcome is unparalleled, no other species is even close and yet most of us don’t even attempt to reach our potential. I’m currently writing a book about personal transformation through mental grit and resilience but it’s also something I’m continually exploring for myself.

I currently have a day job in Branding and design but fitness and Grit is where my passion lies. I’ve got PCC (Progressive Callisthenics Certification) in calisthenics instruction, a very old qualification in gym instruction and have reached a masters grade in Chinese martial arts where I teach classes and occasionally seminars. I love seeing people transform their lives through fitness and overcoming mental challenges to find more from themselves.

Steve: Tell us about your current workouts or fitness routines.  What does a typical day or week look like for you in terms of fitness and exercise?

Chris James: My current fitness routine is mostly callisthenics (bodyweight) using pull-up bars and gymnastic rings although I do like to swing a kettlebell and maybe the odd truck tyre around now and then. I’ll typically train 5-6 days a week at different intensities with two days of push workouts and two days of pull workouts. The other two workouts will be legs and skills-based (levers and flags etc), fun and playing around or HIIT.

Although I like some ‘trick’ moves such as the human flag most of my callisthenics training is about getting stronger and more functional. I also run at varying distances and perform burpees (with push-up) several times a week as I’m endeavouring to beat my PR time of 5mins 4seconds.

Steve: What is your diet like?  Have you discovered any important rules in the area of diet that pertain specifically to people over 40 that have helped you succeed or make progress?

Chris James: I’ve been training in one form or another since I took up martial arts 37 years ago. So, when it comes to nutrition I’ve seen it, read it and probably tried it. Honestly, I hate cultish behaviour around food and with the internet being what it is, it has gotten much worse.

I’d still say after all my empirical study the best thing is to eat a balanced diet of mostly healthy foods (and I believe we all know what that means but like to pretend we don’t as its lets us off accountability), drink (alcohol) in moderation if you want but be aware of what you’re putting in your mouth at all times.

Now, when we get older things may change a little but the basics are still there… it’s just you perhaps don’t need as much as you once did.

You’re fat? You’re eating too much (as in calories) – Eat less. Do more.
Too skinny? You’re probably not eating enough (quality) calories) – Eat better. Train more.
Want more muscle? Train harder or more efficiently. Eat better.

Try different diets if you like, you may find the one diet that works for you… Just don’t go spouting that sh*t like it’s a religion because it may not work for others. For example, I have found that intermittent fasting works for me in that it helps me balance my energy and manage food intake easily. I also found I train better fasted. Now you can throw all the data you have at me but I KNOW it works FOR ME. The end.

8 years ago I also gave up wheat (and by default gluten). I’m not claiming to be coeliac or even intolerant as such – BUT what I do know is that after 2 weeks without it I felt so different and much better that I won’t add it back into my diet. It wasn’t that I’d felt bad with it, just that I felt better without it. And, when I did inadvertently eat some – I had a very bad day (guts – it wasn’t pretty).

Steve: What do you think are some of the key guidelines or rules that are necessary for someone over 40 to be successful in fitness and health?  What things do you do differently now compared to what you would have done when you were in your 20s and 30s?

Chris James: I’m not the greatest person to answer this as I can’t remember a time since I was 15 and took up martial arts that I wasn’t training/conditioning one way or another. I’m perhaps wiser and certainly more knowledgeable/experienced than I was in my 20s and 30s and I accept this could just be me, but generally, I don’t do anything differently now.

There is possibly one exception (now I’m OLD) and that is I’m more in-tune with my body now and will listen to warnings about rest and injury. If I feel a twinge in a muscle or something doesn’t feel right I will assess and decide whether it is wise to carry on or not with whatever was causing it. I will either immediately change something or stop with zero f’s given. For me, health and performance come first… Not my training ‘ego’.

So, my advice is simple, if someone were to be starting and/or coming back to fitness after a long time sedentary (or at least not performing as they once were) when they are 40+ I’d suggest working into it slowly. Be sensible. You only have to watch those video-clip TV shows of someone now overweight tries to dance like they used to and end up falling off a table or something. Funny, but stupid. And to my mind unnecessary if people just kept fit and active.

You can’t undo twenty years of sitting on your butt in 6 weeks despite what popular programmes tell/sell you. Yes, you can undoubtedly make a lot of progress but be sensible and take it slow. You’ll get there but it’s a journey, not a race. You don’t finish a 24hr event by going fast… And I can guarantee you this because I’ve watched many people fail due to their over-exuberance. This is the same with getting back into training, I’ve watched many people suddenly get inspired and go so hard at it for 3 or 4 weeks then it’s all over – either due to injury or burn out.

Steve: Fitness-wise, where do you see yourself and what do you see yourself doing 10 years from now?  20 years from now?

Chris James: I don’t spend much time looking into the future as it’s kind of mental masturbation. Sure, have goals, plans and even dreams but they ultimately mean nothing. Every day I wake up is a temporary victory. If I have to make a plan I’ll say that in ten or twenty years from now I’ll still be doing what I’m doing, that is, working hard breaking the stereotypes and challenging myself to do more, not less. It’s often said less often demonstrated that age is just a number and I often have to think before I remember how ‘old’ I am… but maybe that’s just my age 😉. Training and fitness is a lifestyle and it’s one that I enjoy with zero intention of growing old gracefully and fulfilling the standard paradigm. That’s for other people, not me.

Steve: What are your current fitness goals?

Chris James: I can perform strict pull-ups and push-ups until anyone watching would get bored and wander away however I’ve been struggling to get a bar muscle-up. I’m working on that. As for the rest of my goals… To stay ‘badass’ and increase my miles at the next World’s Toughest Mudder I can get to.

Steve:  What are your biggest challenges presently in terms of health and fitness?  Any plans in place to overcome those challenges?

Chris James: In terms of fitness, I want to keep getting stronger and be able to run further easier. My health has thankfully been good, I presume as a result of lifestyle and maybe some luck because I’d not claim to have great genetics. I currently have no injuries and I’m healthy as far as I can tell. My resting pulse is 42-44 most days so I’ll take that as a sign my heart is OK, my vo2 max (measured by a watch) is in the 50s and my blood pressure is great. I had a recent call to the doctors for a ‘health check’ as they haven’t seen me for so long (I think they wanted to make sure I was still around) and was given a ‘keep doing whatever you’re doing’ comment with a note that if they had to comment on anything it was that my ‘bad’ cholesterol could be a little lower even though it was nowhere near at risk of anything. The nurse admitted she was just looking for something to “get me with” as we were laughing about my ‘poster boy’ status.

Steve: Who are some athletes or role models in our age bracket (40s, 50s, 60s) who inspire you?  Why?

Chris James: I could probably throw lots of names in here of guys and gals 50+ that inspire me when it comes to fitness that I’ve met at Tough Mudders/World’s Toughest Mudders. Notably, Jim Campbell who keeps turning up and doing events despite almost being killed in a motorcycle accident a few years back. He’s earned the moniker Da Goat because he’s just so goddam tough… We’re talking almost Chuck Norris status here. His fitness may not be as it once was due to the injury but his heart, soul and spirit are unbreakable. When I grow up I want to be that tough. There is also my friend and fellow athlete/competitor Mark James, a retired Navy SEAL that I met via Tough Mudder. He’s the same age as me and still out there kicking ass and training Navy SEALs. I have another friend via TM called James Brown that’s a couple of years older but you’d never know it… Although he’s not a thin and skinny marathon runner, that guy can put in some serious miles and runs Ultra-Marathons for breakfast. I think I’ve got him when it comes to push-ups and pull-ups though (so if you’re reading this Jimmy – up your game 😊 )

I can’t think of anyone that’s a widely known public figure and I don’t tend to idolise anyone but my single biggest inspiration most people know of would be Bruce Lee, I’d love to see what he would be right now if he hadn’t died so young and tragically.

Although not quite one of us old folk’s yet I’ve been inspired by people like David Goggins and Jocko Willink. If I’m feeling demotivated all I have to do is put them on YouTube or a Podcast. I also love the work of Steve Maxwell and Mark Divine as when reading and watching them I’m reminded I’m right, we don’t have to give up and get old, so I guess we can count them as inspirations.

Steve: Where can we find you?  Web site, email, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter?

Chris James: web: https://survivalofthegrittest.com/
email: getgrit@survivalofthegrittest.com
Instagram: @survivalofthegrittest
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/getgrittest/
Twitter: I don’t do Twitter 😊

Steve: Anything else you’d like to add?

Chris James: I’m just a guy doing my thing… If I can help or inspire anyone along the way that’s great as It’s kind of a mission of mine. I’m about to launch a book about mental grit and what it takes to get sh*t done. People can find out about that or contact me through the socials listed. Thank you for wanting to hear about me.

Published by FormIsEverything

Primal health and fitness coach http://www.formiseverything.com

5 thoughts on “Form Is Everything “Fit Over 50” Interview: Chris James

      1. For me at 65 motivation is the hardest part. I’m not paying $500 to participate in a Tuff Mudder! But competition I think is important, either with others or yourself. Most people aren’t like David Goggins who can day In and day out beat themselves without mercy! Maybe his book will have the answer!

        Liked by 2 people

  1. Great job, Steve! This is a great idea for a series to launch! I hope you interview some women as well so that the old ladies in your fan club, like me, get some gal-specific advice. I loved this interview, though, interesting person with a healthy mindset about movement, eating, working out, and life. Bravo to both of you – interviewer and interviewee.

    Like

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